Jharkhand Job 2015 in JSLPS For Block Program Manager – 35 Vacancy


Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society (JSLPS) posted a recruitment advertisement to invite all eligible Indian candidates to apply for the post of 35 Block Program Manager in 2015.

Table of Contents:
 1 Post Details
 2 Salary Details
 3 Eligibility
 4 Selection Procedure
 4.1 Application Fee
 4.2 How to Apply
 5 About Company/Institution
 6 Latest News

Last date to apply – 27/12/2015

Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society Recruitment 2015

Into the table below you can see the name of the post, the total number of posts as advertised into the original recruitment advertisement notification of Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society.

Advertisement
 Name of the postTotal 
 Block Program Manger35

Total number of post – 35

Monthly Salary for Block Program Manager

  • Rs.20,000/- monthly Stipend during for 06 month.

Eligibility Terms

Age: 18 years & above (as on 27/12/2015)

Education: We are looking a person with a 2 years full-time regular Post Graduation degree/PG Diploma in Management/ Social Work/ Rural Development/ Agriculture and allied/ Development

Experience: work experience in relevant field, according to post

Selection Procedure

  • Interview

Application Fee

Category Amount 
 AllNil

How to Apply for Vacancy in Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society

  1. Download the Advertisement
  2. Read the Advertisement Carefully
  3. Complete the Application Form
  4. Send the application & CV at :-

The application shall be received through
e-mail at the given mail id recruitment4jslps@gmail.com
with subject line as “Block Program Manager”

About the Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society

  • JSLPS, under the aegis of Rural Development Department, Government of Jharkhand is an autonomous society registered under the Societies Registration Act, 1860. JSLPS’s mandate is to promote livelihoods amongst disadvantaged communities across the state to reduce the rural poverty. Over the years, it has brought in innovative strategies and interventions to successfully demonstrate enhanced livelihoods among the poor in the state. JSLPS has been designated by the Government of Jharkhand to implement “Aajeevika” (National Rural Livelihoods Mission), in Jharkhand. JSLPS is the nodal agency for NRLM in the state and is expected to engage full time dedicated team of professionals to implement NRLM at state, district and block levels. For More Details about the project

Latest News of Jharkhand State Livelihoods Promotion Society

  1. Two sides of the debate: Prostitution as livelihood or victimhood? – 

    While human rights violations are common throughout India, they are particularly prevalent in the lives of those involved in sex work. Discrimination against sex workers in India is as much an issue as the discrimination faced by other marginalised groups along lines of class, caste, diverse sexualities or religion. Sex work is not treated as work, but as an unhealthy and immoral lifestyle threatening to taint the “innocent” public. Interestingly, the advent of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s saw governments make great efforts to target sex workers in the global and national responses to the HIV epidemic. Sex workers were targeted as vectors of the spread of HIV and governments were determined to save the `bridge population’ of men, using sex work interventions only as a means of protecting ‘respectable’ women from HIV.

    In many parts of the country, sex workers turned this around and made it an opportunity to mobilise attention to their health, safety and rights. However, this picture is complicated by politically powerful faith-based constituencies, an anti-trafficking movement that denies the agency and rights of sex workers, and powerful funders. UN positions demonstrated some leadership on sex worker rights early in the epidemic but later appeared to acquiesce to prohibitionist views.

    Anti-trafficking activists with support from radical feminists argue that sex work itself is violence because of their belief that all entry into sex work is involuntary, forced, through deception, bribed, blackmailed or lured and sexually exploited by unscrupulous traffickers. Their argument, especially about minor girls, is valid but the underpinning of abolitionism that governs their arguments takes the focus away from finding and punishing the traffickers to rescuing and rehabilitating sex workers without consent.

    The fracture in this method comes from the idea that adult women who were trafficked as children or otherwise are pulled into an indiscriminate rescue and rehabilitation plan disregarding their ability to consent at the time of rescue. In these policies, the lines between trafficking, childprostitution and sex work of adults—however distinct in reality—are purposely blurred.

    On the other hand, the National Network of Sex Workers (NNSW) is vociferous in the articulation of the rights of sex workers. The NNSW, a national federation of sex worker-led organizations and allies from Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu, NNSW envisions a world where sex work is recognized as work. A world that is just and does not criminalise sex work, where adult men, women and transgender persons have the right to earn through providing sexual services and live with dignity and remain free from violence, exploitation, stigma and discrimination.

    The Supreme Court has also opined that sex workers have a right to dignity. On July 19, 2011, the apex court appointed a panel to deliberate on various aspects of sex workers’ rehabilitation and to provide them with a dignified life. The three terms of reference of the panel include prevention of trafficking, rehabilitation of sex workers who wish to quit sex work and conditions conducive for sex workers to live with dignity in accordance with the provisions of Article 21 of the Constitution.

    The Justice Verma committee, set up in the aftermath of the Nirbhaya gang rape case of December 2012, also acknowledged the distinction between women trafficked for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation and adult consenting women in sex work of their own volition. The committee in its report introduced a chapter on trafficking and recommended the amendment of Section 370 of the Indian Penal Code which deals with the offence of Trafficking of Persons. Inappositely, the definition of the term ‘exploitation’ included ‘prostitution’ itself. This, in essence, meant that ‘prostitution’ would now be interpreted as exploitation in the amendment.

    The NNSW appealed to the commission, which clarified that the thrust of the amended Section 370 was to protect women and children from being trafficked; it had not intended to bring within the ambit of the section sex workers who practice of their own volition. Further, the recast ought not to be interpreted to permit law enforcement agencies to harass sex workers who undertake activities of their own free will, and their clients. For the first time, a government-appointed panel recognised the distinction between women trafficked for the purpose of commercial sexual exploitation and adult consenting women in sex work of their own volition.

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