Jobs in Delhi in NIELIT For 94 Dy Director, Asst Director & Various Post in 2015


Last updated on 19/01/2016

National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology (NIELIT), Delhi posted a recruitment advertisement to invite all eligible Indian candidates to apply for the post of 94 Deputy Director, Assistant Director & Others post in 2015.

Table of Contents:
 1 Post Details
 2 Salary Details
 3 Eligibility
 4 Selection Procedure
 4.1 Application Fee
 4.2 How to Apply
 5 About Company/Institution
 6 Latest News

Last date to apply online – 29/01/2016

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National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology Recruitment 2016

Into the table below you can see the name of the post the total number of posts as advertised into the original recruitment advertisement notification of National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology.

Non-S&T Category

Sr.No. Name of the postTotal
01 Deputy
Director (Law)
 01
02 Assistant
Director (DB)
 01
03 Assistant
Director (Fin.)
 02
04 Assistant Director
(Admn.)
 03
05 Finance Officer 01
06Admn. Officer01
07Senior Assistant(Accounts)01
08Library & Information
Assistant
01
09Front Office
Counselor
01
10Assistant (Accounts)02
11Assistant05
12Stenographer06
13Jr. Assistant13

S&T Category

14Scientist -‘D’03
15Scientist -‘C’07
16Scientist -‘C’ (Marketing)01
17Scientist-‘B’20
18Sr. Technical Assistant16
19Technical Assistant06
20Jr. Technical Assistant03

Total number of post – 94

Scale of Pay for Deputy Director, Assistant Director & Various

  • Sr.No. 1 to 4 Rs.15600-39100+Grade Pay Rs.6600/-
  • Sr.No.5 to 9 Rs.9300-34800+Grade Pay Rs.4200/-
  • Sr.No.10 to 12 Rs.5200-20200+Grade Pay Rs.2400/-
  • Sr.No.13 Rs.5200-20200+Grade Pay Rs.1900/-
  • Sr.No.14 Rs.15600-39100+Grade Pay Rs.7600/-
  • Sr.No.15 & 16 Rs.15600-39100+Grade Pay Rs.6600/-
  • Sr.No.17 Rs.15600-39100+Grade Pay Rs.5400/-
  • Sr.No.18 Rs.9300-34800+Grade Pay Rs.4200/-
  • Sr.No.19 Rs.5200-20200+Grade Pay Rs.2400/-
  • Sr.No.20 Rs.5200-20200+Grade Pay Rs.1900/-

Eligibility Terms

Age: 18 years & above (as on 14/01/2016)

Education: As per National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology norms.

Experience: Work experience in relevant field, according to post.

Selection Procedure

  • Interview

Application Fee

Category Amount 
 AllNil

How to Apply for Vacancy in National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology

  1. Download the Advertisement
  2. Read the Advertisement Carefully
  3. Register Online
  4. Complete Application Form
  5. Submit the Fee
  6. Print the Complete Application Form

About the National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology

Name of the CompanyNational Institute of
Electronics and Information
Launched1990
Societies Registration Act1960
Jointly developedAICTE and DeitY

Latest News of National Institute of Electronics and Information Technology

  1. Five Signs the Drone War Is Undermining the ‘War on Terror’ – 

    The Intercept — a website launched by First Look Media with Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill in the wake of the Snowden revelations last year — was founded to promote official transparency and accountability. This fall, it scored maybe its biggest scoop since then: a cache of secret documents that expose the operations of the Obama administration’s drone wars.

    In a dramatic expansion of a program first launched under the George W. Bush administration, the Obama administration has been conducting airstrikes on alleged terrorists in Yemen, Somalia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and beyond. It’s part of a bid to run up the body count in the “war on terror” without committing ground troops or attracting media scrutiny.

    These strikes, however, have proven controversial, both for their rising (if opaque) civilian toll and for enshrining a policy of killing people — with seemingly little oversight — in countries with whom the U.S. is not at war. “Drones are a tool,”writes Scahill. “The policy is assassination.”

    Details about the drone war and reliable death tolls are difficult to come across. But The Intercept was able to sift through some detailed classified documents provided by an anonymous source who was reportedly close to the program. The source revealed the documents on the grounds that the public has the right to “understand the process by which people are placed on kill lists.”

    The Intercept’s extensive series on The Drone Papers deserves to be read in full. But here are five main takeaways and excerpts from the series.

    1. The Obama administration absolutely loves drones.

    Targeted assassination is “the politically advantageous thing to do — low cost, no U.S. casualties, gives the appearance of toughness,” said Dennis Blair, Obama’s former director of national intelligence, to the New York Times.

    The Obama administration has been merciless in its use of drones. Glenn Carle, a former senior CIA officer, told The Intercept, “If there are people who we, in our best efforts, assess to be trying to kill us, we can make their life as short as possible. And we do it.”

    The numbers are stark, particularly in the early years of the Obama administration. When Obama took office, for instance, only one U.S. drone strike had occurred in Yemen. By 2012, there was a drone strike reported every six days. And from 2011 to 2012, drone strikes in Afghanistan increased by 72 percent.

    Efforts to scale up drone technology have been heavily funded. The Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Task Force, an entity of the Department of Defense, was established in 2008 to study the intelligence and surveillance needs of war fighters. By 2012 it was a multi-billion dollar advocacy department working to purchase new surveillance technologies. The task force claimed it would help increase the number of successful capture operations, though the drone war is much more reputed for killing targets than capturing them.

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